TOOL TIPS-Tool Pick For August (Where Have I Been?!?!?!)

I pull up to the house and unload my tools, must be over a thousand dollars worth of tools that aren’t your typical stuff the average homeowner normally sees. I have written about my IR thermometer in a past “Tool Porn” article but I also have outlet/GFCI testers, live wire testers, a thermohygrometer (a very fancy way of saying something that tests humidity and temperature), a gas sniffer to see if there are any gas leaks and many other fun things. Now, what do the homeowners always geek out about I ask you? My collapsible ladders! I swear, I think I could make a killing just selling my ladders to my clients and buying a new one for the next inspection. So this brings me to the next topic for “Tool Porn”, the collapsible ladder!!

A 15' ladder collapsed down for carrying.

There is a common misperception about home inspectors. Buyers think we will get on ANY roof and walk it completely. I’m here to tell you a little secret, I don’t get paid enough and homeowners don’t want to pay me enough to get up on every roof! My rule of thumb is if I can reach it with my 15′ ladder and it doesn’t look like the ski jump at the Olympics, I’ll get up there. If not, I will look from the ground and/or eves with binoculars and I always try to walk the attic space. This being said, I carry a 12′ telescoping ladder and a 15′ as well for that extra little bit.

The telescoping ladder is perfect for me in this occupation. I can carry both of my ladders in the back of my work vehicle (my Honda Element) and still have plenty of room for my tool bags and they are easy to get in and out of a home without banging up the walls. I have had the foldable ladders and used the Little Giants. Besides being so heavy that they feel like they are constructed from lead it seems like you need a Masters in Origami to get them to go the way you want! Also, I can poke this ladder up through an attic hatch in the middle of a garage space even when there are no walls nearby with my telescoping ladder.

My extendable ladder pushed up through an attic access hatch.

My ladder doesn't need to even rest on a wall which is nice for instance in this 5,400 sq ft home because I don't risk marking up the walls.

What is the one drawback to the telescoping ladder? If you are not careful while collapsing it, you can get your hands pinched. I have only had one good blood blister from this in about 4 years but it definitely will be something I remember for a time. This ladder is perfect for a homeowner as well because you won’t have a bunch of space in your garage taken up with some extension ladder that you only use once a year and trust me on this, if you feel like you need a ladder to clean the second story gutters of your home just pay a handy-man twice a year to do it for you! Well worth it. You get to stimulate the local economy and leave the stunts to people who are used to getting up on ladders regularly and do it for a living.

That’s it for now.

Thanks for reading,

That Home Inspector Guy

About Travis "That Home Inspector Guy" Moyer

I am a certified home inspector, rehabber, landlord, carpenter, handyman and generally inquisitive person who wants to know how everything works. I love to educate other DIY homeowners and potential homeowners about projects that they may be interested in.

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